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From the Collections of the Canadian War Museum

A Violent Peace: The Cold War, Peacekeeping, and Recent Conflicts, 1945 to the present



Photos

Artillery in Action

Twenty-five-pounder gun of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Korea, May 1951. The Battalion was formed in 1950 for United Nations Service in Korea.
Library and Archives Canada, SF-1761
Library and Archives Canada, SF-1761

Servicewomen

Canadian servicewomen in Korea heading off for a wash. Note the flip-flops on the woman at left. Typical of field conditions, no two women wear exactly the same uniform.
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19820095-005
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19820095-005

A War of Patrols

Static lines of defence and Korea's mountainous terrain increased the importance of small-unit patrols to gather information and keep the enemy off guard. In this photo, tired 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade soldiers return from patrol loaded on tanks.
Library and Archives Canada, pa-145367
Library and Archives Canada, pa-145367

Memorial, Korea

The Canadian Korean War Memorial Garden is situated in Naechon, just below the hills defended by Canadian forces in the Battle of Kapyong in April 1951. Various Canadian organizations award a number of scholarships each year to Korean students of the Kapyong Buk Middle School as a "living memorial" and to provide ongoing support to the Korean people. The children from this school also assist in maintaining the memorial park.
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 20050045-1557
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 20050045-1557

A Desperate Measure

When the enemy broke into a defensive position, defending troops sometimes exercised a dangerous option: calling for artillery fire on their own positions to drive off the attack. Canadian 2nd Lieutenant E.H. Hollyer, a platoon commander with the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, made this desperate call on the night of 2-3 May 1953 as Chinese troops overran his unit. After 90 minutes of heavy shelling, the Chinese finally withdrew. More than 90 Canadian and South Korean troops had been killed, wounded, or captured during the battle.
Library and Archives Canada, e002505269
Library and Archives Canada, e002505269

Reminiscing

E.H. Hollyer (right) and D.J. Redknap recall the battle, fifty years later. Redknap, a gunner, was one of those who responded to Hollyer's emergency request.
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19970045-002
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19970045-002

Canada Goes Nuclear

For many years, Canada played an important nuclear role in NATO defence planning. The Honest John was a simple, free-flight rocket that could also deliver a low-yield nuclear warhead.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, EF64-9605-7
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, EF64-9605-7

Honest John

The launching of an Honest John rocket at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, 27 October 1961.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence/CC-12390-2
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence/CC-12390-2

The Birth of Peacekeeping

Lester B. Pearson's suggestion that impartial military observers could help restore peace during the 1956 Suez Crisis marked the onset of modern peacekeeping. This photo shows United Nations Emergency Force (or UNEF) personnel on patrol in Egypt as part of this mission.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ME64076-2
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ME64076-2

Canada's Contribution

Canada became a respected international player through its commitments to Western defence and peacekeeping. In this photo, Lt. Dave Sproule and LCpl Ed Foster scan the Egypt-Israel frontier during a desert patrol in a Ferret scout car as part of the UNEF mission.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ZK-1946-17
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ZK-1946-17

Foot Patrol

A soldier of the 3rd Battalion, Royal 22nd Regiment of Canada, patrols an abandoned street on the Green Line near Paphos II Gate, Cyprus.
United Nations, NAGATA UN123,765

Operation Musk Ox

Operation Musk Ox (February to May 1946) gave the Canadian military experience in living and moving over long distances in the icy conditions of the Arctic, where the average daily temperature was approximately -32° C. In this photo, the Canadian-designed Penguin armoured snowmobile hauls two sleds across the Arctic.
United Nations, NAGATA UN123,765
Library and Archives Canada, pa-134302

Air Support

Canadians unload an American glider during Operation Musk Ox. Ground operations in the Arctic depended on aircraft for supplies, food, and fuel.
Library and Archives Canada, pa-196940
Library and Archives Canada, pa-196940



Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, PL-107769
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, PL-107769

Scramble!

Canada kept a permanent air contingent in Western Europe for more than 40 years, and would have sent more aircraft in the event of war. Control of the air would have been essential in protecting NATO's positions and attacking the Warsaw Pact's superior ground forces.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, PCN3679
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, PCN3679

HMCS Brandon in the Arctic

HMCS Brandon is a Maritime Coast Defence Vessel (MCDV). The main purpose of these vessels is coastal surveillance, though they also perform other tasks such as search and rescue, counter-terrorism and anti-smuggling missions. Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, DCS-1648
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, DCS-1648

Leopard 2 in Flight

From the late 1970s, the Canadian Forces addressed the gradual deterioration of many key weapons systems, or "rust out", with new purchases. These included warships, fighter aircraft, and tanks, such as this Leopard 2.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, GN2002-0247-01d
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, GN2002-0247-01d

Dee Dee Brasseur and Fellow Pilot

Brasseur (left) achieved international fame in 1989 by becoming one of only two women to fly the CF-18 Hornet, a world-class jet fighter. In 1999, she was made a Member of the Order of Canada.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, GN2002-0247-01d
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, GN2002-0247-01d

Loading Chaff

Missiles are a deadly threat to all surface ships, especially in narrow waters where they can hit with little warning time. Here, two sailors load a chaff dispenser during the Gulf War in 1991.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, HSD989033-36
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, HSD989033-36

Handshake

Cpl Gaetan Roy with Recconaissance (Recce) Platoon, the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, meets a young resident of Dek'emhare during a familiarization patrol in the Eritrean town 3 January 2001.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-0024a
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-0024a

Izzy Dolls

Master Corporal Mark Isfeld, a military engineer on peacekeeping duty, was 31 when killed in 1994 removing land mines in Croatia. These woolen dolls are called "Izzy" dolls. Before Mark Isfeld died in Croatia in 1994, his mother created them for him to hand out to Croatian children. They are still made and distributed in his memory.









George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19980071-005
George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19980071-005

George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19980071-005

George Metcalf Archival Collection, CWM 19980071-005

Handing out Izzy Dolls

MCpl Perry Collins (left) and Sapper David McCormick (right) of the 4 Engineer Support Regiment hand out "Izzy" dolls to local children outside Senafe, Eritrea on 25 May 2005.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-3125
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-3125



Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IE83-438-3
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IE83-438-3

Grave Stones, Beechwood Cemetery

Beechwood, in Ottawa, Ontario, is home to Canada's National Military Cemetery of the Canadian Forces and the RCMP Memorial Cemetery.
Bill Kent, CWM
Bill Kent, CWM

Remembrance

On 18 July 2002, Master-Corporal Charles Gladue from the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (3 PPCLI) Battle Group, along with American and Romanian soldiers, during the close-out parade and memorial cairn dedication ceremony held at Kandahar Airfield. The 3PPCLI was in Afghanistan in support of Operation Apollo, Canada's military contribution to the international campaign against terrorism. Three days later, the group left Afghanistan, having completed a 6-month deployment.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, AP2002-5645.a
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, AP2002-5645.a





Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, VKD01-0005-01A
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, VKD01-0005-01A



Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IXC88-48
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IXC88-48

Canadian Rangers

The Canadian Rangers are Canada's primary military presence across the vast and sparsely populated high Arctic and in remote coastal regions. Ranger Eric Hitkolok, Ranger Calvin Pedersen and Ranger Gary Kukilukak of the Kugluktuk Ranger Patrol march in file with their CF-issue .303-calibre Lee-Enfield rifles shouldered.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6344a
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6344a

Military Exercises, Bosnia

On 27 July 2001, Quick Reaction Force member Corporal H. Pagiatakis (front) runs for cover as other members of her team take up positions to defend the Griffon helicopter that delivered them to this hilltop exercise area. Corporal Pagiatakis was an Army Reservist serving with Task Force Bosnia-Herzegovina (TFBH) on Roto 8 of Operation PALLADIUM, Canada's contribution to the NATO Stabilization Force (SFOR).
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6587
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6587



Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IEC95-546-12
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, IEC95-546-12

Ready, Aim...

Corporal Zita Szekely, a reservist with the Canadian Scottish Regiment, 8 August 2000.
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, 39CBG00-023-29
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, 39CBG00-023-29

Field Artillery, Bosnia

On 23 June 2001, F Battery, 2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (2 RCHA) fires the LG-1 Mk II, a 105-mm howitzer; No 2 gun (foreground) is completing its firing cycle. Based at Petawawa, Ontario, F Battery was deployed with Task Force Bosnia-Herzegovina (TFBH) on Operation PALLADIUM, Canada's contribution to the NATO Stabilization Force (SFOR).
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6537a
Courtesy of the Department of National Defence, ISD01-6537a

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

Afghanistan is littered with millions of explosives. Canadian combat engineers in Kabul regularly collected, stockpiled, and disposed of deadly weapons with controlled demolitions.
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne

Liaising with Locals

Captain Alex Watson of Rocky Mountain House, Alberta consults elders in a village close to Kandahar Airfield in February 2002 to gain their cooperation with coalition efforts.
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne

Rebuilding Education

Sergeant Mariangeles Najlis meets with Afghans to help transform a former Soviet military base in Kabul into a school for 1,100 children.
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne

Securing the Landing

Canadian troops secure their landing site before setting out in search of al Qaida positions on the Whale's Back mountain in eastern Afghanistan, March 2002.
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne
Courtesy of Stephen Thorne

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War Art

Incoming
Painted by Edward Zuber in 1978

This painting shows soldiers of B Company, the Royal Canadian Regiment reacting to a communist artillery attack on their section of the line on 23 October 1952. The 45 minute bombardment was one of the heaviest Canadians endured in Korea. As an 18- year old art student and photographer's apprentice, Zuber enlisted in the military in 1950. After two years as a parachutist, he became a sniper. Zuber carried a sketch book with him throughout his Korean service, details from which can be found in several of his paintings.
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM 19890328-008
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM 19890328-008

The Eagle Dance

This print depicts a Nehiyaw or Plains Cree Eagle Dancer. The Eagle Dance marked the organization and preparation of a war party or its victorious return. Individual dancers also recited their service or war record.
Courtesy of Don McLeay
Courtesy of Don McLeay

TOPP HIGH - Painted by Edward Zuber in 1991

In 1991, Ted Zuber was appointed an official war artist to document Canadian participation in the first Persian Gulf war. On his third night in the Gulf, a Scud missile struck at about 11 pm. He raced for the bomb shelter and was the first one there. It was pitch black until someone else switched on a battery-operated light that reflects off the gas masks in the painting. TOPP is an acronym for 'Threat Oriented Personal Protection' and 'High' means you have to put on everything by way of full protection.
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM 19960062-014
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM 19960062-014

Coalition Soldiers, Khandahar Air Base, July 2003
Painted by Allan MacKay in 2004

After the 11 September 2001 attacks on the United States, Canada joined an international campaign against terrorism. Operation Apollo was Canada's military contribution to the war in Afghanistan from October 2001 to October 2003. This painting depicts a soldier in camouflage, Jeremiah Wallace, two Afghan men, and an armoured vehicle at Khandahar Airfield in July 2003.
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM 20040060-001
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art CWM  20040060-001

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Audio Clips

Voices of Peacekeepers

Listen to the stories of Canadian peacekeepers.
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    Date created: October 27, 2006 | Last updated: October 7, 2009