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The Later Cold War
A Changing Fleet

Canada's navy changed and shrank in the latter part of the Cold War, but continued to face threats and meet alliance obligations. Despite the addition of some newer vessels, by the late 1970s it faced "rust-out" due to the gradual deterioration of ships and equipment.

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Hands to Supper - Galley and Steamline - HMCS Yukon
Hands to Supper - Galley and Steamline - HMCS Yukon

Mess attendants (centre) aboard HMCS Yukon serve food from a steam table while their comrades (right) pass down the line to be served.

Crew accommodations aboard Canadian ships substantially changed after the Second World War. While sailors had previously slept, eaten, and lived in the same space - called a mess - post-war ships were different. Modified or built to provide cafeteria-style food service in galleys, they also incorporated bunks that replaced hammocks.

Hands to Supper - Galley and Steamline - HMCS Yukon
Painted by David William Jones
Beaverbrook Collection of War Art
CWM 19820736-001





HMCS Iroquois, Artist's Concept
HMCS Athabaskan
Model, HMCS Bras d'Or
HMCS Bras d'Or
HMCS Ojibwa
HMCS Ojibwa Model
Uniform, Lieutenant Commander Edward Ross Murray
Model, HMCS Assiniboine
HMCS Gatineau
HMCS Gatineau
Model, HMCS Nipigon
Naval Chaff Launcher
The Watch Below - Engine Room - HMCS Yukon
Hands to Supper - Galley and Steamline - HMCS Yukon
FN C1D Rifle
Diving Knife
Soviet Naval Aircraft
Soviet Aircraft Carrier and Bombers
Baltic Patrol